Author Appreciations

STEPHEN DEAS ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

You don't have to look very far to see Michael's influences on my work

You don't have to look very far to see Michael's influences on my work. The silver kings germinated long ago from Elric and his kin, and, dammit, you didn't even have to read the books to get it. He proved that writing fantasy wasn't some closet shame but rock and roll, and I still have Hawkwind's "Chronicles of the Black Sword" on my play list. Dammit, he even toured with them. He made writing look cool.
JON SPRUNK ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

I will be Eternally Grateful

I was in junior high school when a friend loaned me the first volume of the Elric Saga. I was immediately intrigued by the concept - the feeble ruler of a dying, ancient race battles threats with the help of a demon lord and a soul-eating sword.
GREG BEAR ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

Pioneer of cyberpunk AND steampunk

Michael Moorcock may be one of the most-often cited names in my repertoire of who did what and when in science fiction. As a pioneer of cyberpunk AND steampunk, both a literary phenom and pulp master extraordinaire, Mr. Moorcock is without parallel.
STEPHEN BAXTER ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

An Appreciation of Moorcock's The Nomad of Time

In his introduction to Gollancz's Michael Moorcock Collection, John Clute credits Moorcock with, among many other things, 'the invention (more or less) of steampunk'. I'd say Clute got that about right. And once, this godfather of steampunk was generous enough to blurb my own proto-steampunk novel, Anti-Ice (1993): 'At last! A scientific romance to rival Verne!' I was hugely thrilled to get such an endorsement from a writer like Moorcock, and I got to tell him so when I first met him at around that time. And, as with Clute, while Moorcock was very kind with his praise, I’d say he got it about right about the nature of my book.
RICHARD MORGAN ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

Companion to Heroes

The city was old, begrimed by time. A place of wind-worn stones and tumbled masonry, its towers tilting and its walls crumbling. Wild sheep cropped the grass that grew between cracked paving stones . . . and on a broad ledge halfway up an equally cracked cliff-face, leaned back in the sun of an unfeasibly hot Scottish summer, an eleven year old boy disappears enthralled into that world of ruins and magic, never really to emerge again.
AJ DALTON ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

Michael Moorcock is a legend

I first read a Michael Moorcock book 30 years ago. I was 13 at the time and finally tall enough to reach my dad's shelf of golden age scifi books. My stretching fingers snagged a copy of The Singing Citadel (1970) and it tumbled at my feet like a forbidden grimoire. It was a book of wonder, a book that blended scifi and fantasy, made me smile, frown and begin to dream.
ALLEN STROUD ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

Michael Moorcock Killed My Darlings

I started teaching creative writing in 2003. I distinctly remember my first class for two things. The first, that I managed to draw a marker pen line on my forehead while parting my floppy fringe with my hand and the second, the question a student put to me at the end of the session. "Have you read Michael Moorcock?"
EDWARD COX ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

I discovered Michael Moorcock at the perfect time

It was a novel called The Warhound and the World's Pain, which I had bought on a whim from a book club. 1992 was a time of change for me. I'd decided to take writing more seriously; I was waking up to the world around me, which seemed to be expanding with every thought I had; I was beginning to truly understand the endless possibilities of words. And by introducing me to Ulrich von Bek, one of the many incarnations of the Eternal Champion that exist throughout the multiverse, Michael Moorcock showed me there was so much more to the realm of fantasy than I ever imagined before.
ADRIAN TCHAIKOVSKY ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

Michael Moorcock and Epic Fantasy

Conan was strong and Aragorn was noble, but Elric was a sickly albino who needed a cocktail of exotic drugs just to get out of bed, let alone cut his mighty swathe; or else a demonic sword that ate the souls of his victims - and friends - in order to keep him on his feet - a willing submission to the sort of thing that Aragorn so explicitly has no truck with, and that Conan has no need of.
MARK LAWRENCE ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

Fantasy Milestones

There are three fantasy milestones in my life, Tolkien, Moorcock, and George RR Martin. Despite his success I still feel the need to qualify Martin with a first name - Tolkien and Moorcock have reached the bedrock status where surname alone will do it.
MICHAEL J WARD ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

I Lost My Cherry to a White Wolf

There are many authors that have influenced my writing, but without a doubt, it was Michael Moorcock who really opened my eyes to the true potential of the fantasy/sci-fi genre. You see, in some ways before I stumbled on his works I was something of a literary virgin.
GAVIN SMITH ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

The Life & Times of a Jerry Cornelius Fan

More than thirty years before Cersei and Jaime made incest cool Jerry Cornelius fell in love with his sister, Catherine. Named for a greengrocer in Notting Hill Gate, Jerry Cornelius was the bi-sexual, occasionally hermaphroditic, shape shifting, physicist, rock guitarist and assassin hero (well protagonist, in fact sometimes he just spent books lying in a coffin) created by Michael Moorcock. Moorcock is an author responsible for a much higher percentage of all that is interesting in genre fiction than many would be prepared to admit.
MIKE CAREY ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

Memories of Moorcock

In the 1970s, the decade in which I first attempted to grow up, books were expensive commodities. There was a thing back then called the Net Book Agreement, which forbade bookshops from offering any books at discounted rates or from attempting to secure discounts from publishers. The NBA was a Victorian invention, mostly benign in its effects in that it protected book publishers from the full frenzy of the marketplace (Amazon, I’m looking at you). But it did mean that books, for the teenaged me, were far from being pocket money commodities. I mostly relied on the public libraries of Walton, Liverpool, to keep my reading habit supplied.
PAUL CORNELL ON MICHAEL MOORCOCK

I encountered Jerry Cornelius at far too young an age

I encountered Jerry Cornelius at far too young an age, in a public library where all SF was kept together and regarded as obviously okay for children. I was intrigued by the fact that one of Jerry's many alter egos had my surname. The Cornelius books, for all their cracked prose, nevertheless had a feeling of utter narrative confidence about them, as if the world was actually cubist, and everyone else knew that except me, the junior reader.